Twaweza.org

Welcome to Twaweza

Twaweza means “we can make it happen” in Swahili. Twaweza works on enabling children to learn, citizens to exercise agency and governments to be more open and responsive in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. We have programs, staff and offices across all three countries, and a world respected practice of learning, monitoring and evaluation. Our flagship programs include Uwezo, Africa’s largest annual citizen assessment to assess children’s learning levels across hundreds of thousands of households, and Sauti za Wananchi, Africa’s first nationally representative mobile phone survey.  We undertake effective public and policy engagement, through powerful media partnerships and global leadership of initiatives such as the Open Government Partnership. Read more.

Singing for change?

Can artists change people's views? Even their actions? Can we use concerts to convey serious messages or are they just for fun? This monitoring brief provides insight into a campaign focused on young Ugandans, the centre-piece of which was a series o... Read more...

Learning by un-doing: the magic of immersion

Every year, the entire Twaweza team closes up shop and heads to different villages in one of the countries we work in. Why do we do this? And what do we learn? Read more...

Request for Proposals | Sauti za Wananchi Kenya

Twaweza is looking for a competent and reputable organization to undertake a field-based baseline survey of 2,000 households in Kenya, and to run call rounds. Read more...

Request for Proposals | Comparing independent and Government-held data on education in Uganda

Twaweza is seeking a consultant to produce a comparative assessment of Uwezo and existing government data on children’s learning outcomes at primary school level. Read more...

Uganda: are our children learning?

A new study reveals that very few children in Primary 3 and higher are able to do basic reading and mathematics. In Primary 3, nine out of ten children (or 88%) are unable to both read and solve division at Primary 2 level, while in Primary 7, almost... Read more...

Learning Note 3: Motivating civic participation

This learning note introduces the initial findings of a research project which asked a question fundamental to Twaweza’s theory of change: does compelling mass communication contribute to positive behavior change among citizens? Read more...

Kenya: are our children learning?

While 100% of children in Class 3 and higher classes should be able to read basic English and Kiswahili, and do simple mathematics, a new citizen-led assessment report reveals that very few are able to do so. Read more...

In the public eye: Citizens' views on access to information

A large majority of citizens (84%) support the passage of an access to information law. Furthermore, eight out of ten citizens think that information held by public authorities should be accessible to ordinary citizens (77%). Read more...

Did we make it happen? An evaluation of Twaweza's first strategic period

As part of our commitment to continuous reflection and learning, an external evaluation of Twaweza took place in the second half of 2014. Read about whether we achieved our ambitious goals and really made change happen. Read more...

Latest publications

Sauti za Wananchi


Highlighted


  • Are teachers in East Africa's primary schools actually teaching? And do they understand their subject matter? Revealing new charts using data from a World Bank survey examine these questions. Read more...


  • One out of three citizens (33%) on Tanzania Mainland does not know who they will vote for in the upcoming presidential election. No single potential candidate is preferred by more than 15% of the voters. Read more...


  • How (un)equal is East Africa? And does it matter? Twaweza's Open Development Consultant Ben Taylor @mtega has produced a video on the topic for his blog, drawing from recently published data. Read more...